Oct 14 2014

“Sneaky Fox” by Skye Elizabeth Wieland

“Sneaky Fox”
sneakyfox

Notes:
Sneaky Fox is a mixed media artwork that was created with oil pastels and oil paints on cartridge paper with black gesso base. Sneaky Fox was inspired by my current interest in foxes and was the best work that came out of a series of commissioned pastels that I worked on.

If you liked my painting of Sneaky Fox, please don’t hesitate to visit my online store at RedBubble.com to purchase prints, clothing or other apparel with this design.
http://www.redbubble.com/people/skyewieland/works/12133385-sneaky-fox
(These look particularly lovely on the throw cushions)

The creation of this painting can be viewed on my Speed Painting video on YouTube

Please feel free to share this and don’t forget to subscribe to hear about all my latest paintings!

If you are on social media, more of my work can also be seen on my Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/skyewielandartist

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Oct 14 2014

Featured Artist: Darryl Thomas

Featured Artist: Darryl Thomas

Notes from the Artist:
My name is Darryl Thomas and I am a 68 year old veteran and a stroke victim.
I was a professional musician for almost 50 years. During that time I managed to draw something every once-in-a-while until the last 10 years before an illness which devastated my beloved career. After the initial shock, I bought my second computer
and began teaching myself how to use certain art programs to produce the work I was doing before with brushes and paint, and create art work even more satisfying and more challenging than anything I had ever imagined before. The possibilities are absolutely endless. Not to mention cutting expenses of paint; brushes, and canvas; just to name a few.

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Oct 13 2014

Featured Artist: Debra Spegal

Featured Artist: Debra Spegal

Davy Crockett Lake painting 2

November Morning 2

Notes from the Artist:
I am basically a self-taught artist who began drawing and painting at the age of 12. While most of my work is done on a commission basis, I do find time to paint the things I love. Flowers, landscapes, cats, are all a part of my life and my art. My work has been featured on greeting cards and posters. I love drawing and painting older homes, especailly old homeplaces that have character and family history.

Links:
Debra Spegal on the Web: http://debraspegal.fineartstudioonline.com/
Debra Spegal on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DebraWilliamsSpegalStudio

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Oct 12 2014

Featured Artist: Gail Kirtz

Featured Artist: Gail Kirtz

About the Artist:
Gail Kirtz has been a professional artist for twenty years and is known for her richly colored landscapes and expressionistic collages. She was born in Dundalk, MD and grew up in Ashland KY, where she still lives. Her formal art education included fine art studies at The University of Kentucky, specializing in painting and 3-D design. She works in a variety of mediums. Her works hang in private and corporate collections in several states.
She is inspired by the local as well as far afield. Her art is motivated by thought and feeling, using a variety of concepts, showing her growth in the practice of her profession.
Her mixed media collages, oil, acrylic, pastel and watercolor paintings have won over two hundred awards in regional and national juried and open shows.
Images of four of her paintings were purchased by Hollywood filmmaker Wm. John Thinnes and included for use in his independent film “Cold Trail”. Mr. Thinnes is best known for his work on “Th
e Lion King”, Beauty And The Beast”, “Pocahontas”, “Aladdin” and more.

Her studio “Art Of The Redeemed” formerly was located in the Camayo Arcade and the Pendleton Art Center. She currently is creating and teaching
in her home studio.

She is known for her richly colored landscapes and her expressionistic collages.

Links:
Gail Kirtz on the Web: http://gail-kirtz.artistwebsites.com/

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Oct 11 2014

Featured Artist: TQuinn

Featured Artist: TQuinn

About the Artist:
TQuinn has been painting for 2 years discovering his God given talent in retirement. He started sketching, then moved to watercolors and today he enjoys acrylics. He hopes everyone enjoys his paintings as much as he loves painting them.

Links:
TQuinn on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/TQuinn-Art/445686945507785

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Feb 27 2014

Featured Artist: Rachael Roberts

Featured Artist: Rachael Roberts

Since discovering a passion for sculpture, I am fluidly moving towards my own style alongside studying a ‘City and Guilds’ in Ceramics.
As a member of Disability Arts Cymru (DAC), one of my sculptures is currently on exhibit as part of DAC’s 30th Anniversary tour of Wales.

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“Contemplating Lady” is a clay sculpture of a life model which conveys the subtle feminine virtues of a curvaceous lady alongside the reflective qualities of a mindful woman in today’s society.

I recently discovered a passion for sculpting with clay after attending a local class at ‘The Bay Gallery’ (under instruction of Peter Barnes)
Clay work allows me artistic expression alongside the meditative qualities stimulated by artistic practice in general.
Influenced by a variety of ceramic artists I am fluidly moving towards my own style, alongside studying to complete a City and Guilds in Ceramics.
I have had various jobs working within Youth services , Charities and the Education department supporting young people to be creative and expressive using a variety of mediums.

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“Abstract femininity” is a clay sculpture of an abstract female torso, with an accentuated figure which expresses idealized curves.




More images to view online @ Rachael Roberts Art

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Jul 26 2012

KaLAkAri

Featured Artist: KaLAkAri

Notes From the Artist:
Photography is the art, science, and practice of creating pictures by recording radiation on a radiation-sensitive medium, such as a photographic film, or electronic image sensors. Photography uses foremost radiation in the UV, visible and near-IR spectrum. For common purposes the term light is used instead of radiation. Light reflected or emitted from objects form a real image on a light sensitive area (film or plate) or a FPA pixel array sensor by means of a pin hole or lens in a device known as a camera during a timed exposure. The result on film or plate is a latent image, subsequently developed into a visual image (negative or diapositive). An image on paper base is known as a print. The result on the FPA pixel array sensor is an electrical charge at each pixel which is electronically processed and stored in a computer (raster)-image file for subsequent display or processing. Photography has many uses for business, science, manufacturing (f.i. Photolithography), art, and recreational purposes.
The camera is the image-forming device, and photographic film or a silicon electronic image sensor is the sensing medium. The respective recording medium can be the film itself, or a digital electronic or magnetic memory.[4]
Photographers control the camera and lens to “expose” the light recording material (such as film) to the required amount of light to form a “latent image” (on film) or “raw file” (in digital cameras) which, after appropriate processing, is converted to a usable image. Digital cameras use an electronic image sensor based on light-sensitive electronics such as charge-coupled device (CCD) or complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The resulting digital image is stored electronically, but can be reproduced on paper or film.
The basic principle of a camera or camera obscura is that it is a dark room, or chamber from which, as far as possible, all light is excluded except the light that forms the image. On the other hand, the subject being photographed must be illuminated. Cameras can be small, or very large the dark chamber consisting of a whole room that is kept dark, while the object to be photographed is in another room where the subject is illuminated. This was common for reproduction photography of flat copy when large film negatives were used. A general principle known from the birth of photography is that the smaller the camera, the brighter the image. This meant that as soon as photographic materials became sensitive enough (fast enough) to take candid or what were called genre pictures, small detective cameras were used, some of them disguised as a tie pin that was really a lens, as a piece of luggage or even a pocket watch (the Ticka camera).
The invention, or rather the discovery of the camera or camera obscura that provides an image of a scene, still life or portrait is very old, the oldest mentioned discovery being in ancient China. Leonardo da Vinci mentions natural camera obscuras that are formed by dark caves on the edge of a sunlit valley. A hole in the cave wall will act as a pinhole camera and project a laterally reversed, upside down image on a piece of paper. So the invention of photography was really concerned with finding a means to fix and retain the image in the camera obscura. This in fact occurred first using the reproduction of images without a camera when Josiah Wedgewood, from the famous family of potters, obtained copies of paintings on leather using silver salts. As he had no way of fixing them, that is to say to stabilize the image by washing out the non exposed silver salts, they turned completely black in the light and had to be kept in a dark room for viewing.
Renaissance painters used the camera obscura which, in fact, gives the optical rendering in color that dominates Western Art.
The movie camera is a type of photographic camera which takes a rapid sequence of photographs on strips of film. In contrast to a still camera, which captures a single snapshot at a time, the movie camera takes a series of images, each called a “frame”. This is accomplished through an intermittent mechanism. The frames are later played back in a movie projector at a specific speed, called the “frame rate” (number of frames per second). While viewing, a person’s eyes and brain merge the separate pictures together to create the illusion of motion.
Traditional photography burdened photographers working at remote locations without easy access to processing facilities, and competition from television pressured photographers to deliver images to newspapers with greater speed. Photo journalists at remote locations often carried miniature photo labs and a means of transmitting images through telephone lines. In 1981, Sony unveiled the first consumer camera to use a charge-coupled device for imaging, eliminating the need for film: the Sony Mavica. While the Mavica saved images to disk, the images were displayed on television, and the camera was not fully digital. In 1991, Kodak unveiled the DCS 100, the first commercially available digital single lens reflex camera. Although its high cost precluded uses other than photojournalism and professional photography, commercial digital photography was born.
Digital imaging uses an electronic image sensor to record the image as a set of electronic data rather than as chemical changes on film. The primary difference between digital and chemical photography is that chemical photography resists photo manipulation because it involves film and photographic paper, while digital imaging is a highly manipulative medium. This difference allows for a degree of image post-processing that is comparatively difficult in film-based photography and permits different communicative potentials and applications.
Digital imaging has raised ethical concerns because of the ease of manipulating digital photographs in post-processing. Many photojournalists have declared they will not crop their pictures, or are forbidden from combining elements of multiple photos to make “photomontages,” passing them as “real” photographs. Today’s technology has made photo editing relatively simple for even the novice photographer. However, recent changes of in-camera processing allows digital fingerprinting of photos to detect tampering for purposes of forensic photography.
Digital point-and-shoot cameras have become widespread consumer products, outselling film cameras, and including new features such as video and audio recording. Kodak announced in January 2004 that it would no longer sell reloadable 35 mm cameras in western Europe, Canada and the United States after the end of that year. Kodak was at that time a minor player in the reloadable film cameras market. In January 2006, Nikon followed suit and announced that they will stop the production of all but two models of their film cameras: the low-end Nikon FM10, and the high-end Nikon F6. On May 25, 2006, Canon announced they will stop developing new film SLR cameras.[21] Though most new camera designs are now digital, a new 6x6cm/6x7cm medium format film camera was introduced in 2008 in a cooperation between Fuji and Voigtländer.[22][23]
According to a survey made by Kodak in 2007 when the majority of photography was already digital, 75 percent of professional photographers say they will continue to use film, even though some embrace digital

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Aug 15 2011

A.K.A Little Electric Buddha – Keith Dillon


Featured Artist: Keith Dillon

Notes from the Artist:
NEW ART, by dillon, A.K.A, LITTLE ELECTRIC BUDDHA, Hottest new act on the Hip hop scene, his show is shocking. My gallery is open, 24/7, drop by take a look, and pass it on.
http://keith-dillon.artistwebsites.com/

I have been a commercial photographer for many years, working in digital, for 16 years. I work in advertising, product, photojournalism, editorial, and corporate, both in studio, and locations, now working on location most of the time. My advertising work has been in Andy Warhol , INTERVIEW magazine, TOWN & COUNTRY magazine, and MANHATTAN CATALOGUE magazine, and many more. My work has been published in AMERICAN PHOTO magazine in the Nov. / Dec. 2004 issue. I have a background in art direction. My personal work has been shown in The Atlantic City Art Museum, California Museum of Photography, and is in the permanent collection of the Noyes Museum of Art, New Jersey, Los Angeles Center For Digital Art, In the last few years, doing digital photo manipulation, this combines my photographic skills, with my art background. Now working out of Portland OR.

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Oct 26 2013

Featured Artist: Paulo Guimaraes

Featured Artist: Paulo Guimaraes

About the Artist:
Each day brings opportunity to capture that which is known, and that which is unknown. Hidden and presented creations light up the mind in ways unimaginable. Paulo views and absorbs, displaying the processed information through digital means and conventional ways. Either through digital art, digital photography, or painting, Paulo manipulates the inner workings of his mind, and presents the final work for all to hold on to and allow to become a part of them. Paulo has been working at his craft since 2010, each day improving the method of creation to stay fresh in the face of adversity. Paulo resides in the Bronx, NY, which adds a street level sophistication to his work. However, he remains humbled and calm by the presence of his daughter and mother, allowing for soothing artwork under the grit. When not creating, Paulo enjoys several activities such as: fitness training, Brazilian Jujitsu, poetry, eating strange foods, and drinking exotic ales!

I encourage all who visit my profile, to check out my favorites section. I try to have a collection of fine art for all to enjoy!!!
Links:
Website: http://paulo-guimaraes.artistwebsites.com
See Me: https://pauloguimaraes.see.me
Blog: https://thewaytoshaolin.blogspot.com
Facebook:

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Mar 30 2012

Sicht-Weise [by M. Tabatt]

Featured Artist: Mandy Tabatt

Notes From the Artist:
Mein Name ist Mandy Tabatt, ich wurde 1976 in Nordhausen (Thüringen) geboren und lebe noch heute hier, zusammen mit meinem Mann und unseren drei Kindern. Sowohl die Fotografie selbst als auch der anschließende kreative Schöpfungsprozeß, der über die reine (Nach-)Bearbeitung der Bilder hinausgeht, waren lange Zeit mein Hobby. Als Freiberufliche Fotodesignerin habe ich mein liebstes Hobby nun zum Beruf machen können.

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